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Recent Studies Show Insufficient Evidence of Proper Environmental Hospital Cleaning

Recent Studies Show Insufficient Evidence of Proper Environmental Hospital Cleaning

With several recent superbug outbreaks, environmental cleaning in hospitals is especially crucial at this time. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) are known to affect about one in 25 Americans receiving in-patient care. Recent investigation regarding hospital cleaning practices indicate a need for more rigorous trials to determine the best cleaning practices to prevent HAI transmission via hard surfaces.


Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and ECRI Institute analyzed 80 studies conducted between 1998 and 2014 investigating current hospital cleaning methods. The goal of this study was to provide a systematic overview of environmental cleaning on surfaces that are mostly touched by patients and healthcare workers, such as bed rails, tray tables, and nurse call buttons. Overall, less than 35% of these studies focused on patient-centered outcomes such as HAIs meaning a majority of the 80 studies did not provide adequate cleaning information to help prevent infections.


Medicare Applies Ratings to Home Care Providers

Medicare Applies Ratings to Home Care Providers

Searching for a home healthcare provider proved troublesome for many patients in the past. But the Federal Government is aiming to make that search a little easier. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) applied its five-star rating system to Home Healthcare Providers in July.


Of the roughly 12,000 home healthcare providers in the United States, CMS could not collect data sufficient to rate the provider for nearly 3,000 providers -- of the 9,000 remaining, about a third received below average scores (two stars), and only 239 earned a five star rating (the highest score available). Only six agencies received CMS's lowest rating (one star).


Task Force Recommends Three New Preventative Services

Task Force Recommends Three New Preventative Services

The Preventative Services Task Force, a non-partisan group of medical experts, added three items to its list of preventative services which insurance providers are required to cover at no extra cost to the patient. These services include: Hepatitis B screening for those teenagers and adults at high risk of infection, low-dose Aspirin to prevent Pre-eclempsia in at-risk pregnant women, and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus screening after 24 weeks of gestation in asymptomatic pregnant women.


The new recommendations will take effect in 2016.


The Hepatitis B (HBV) recommendation is based on new evidence about antiviral treatments which improve the outcome for people with a high risk of infection, which means that early detection is that much more valuable.


FDA Bans Trans Fats Starting in 2018

FDA Bans Trans Fats Starting in 2018

Have you ever wondered what makes a croissant so delicately crisp and flakey when you bite into it? What about what makes fast food fries salty, delicious, and addicting?


The answer, of course, is fat -- specifically trans fat. But, those tasty snacks will soon need to do without Trans Fat. The Food and Drug Administration has mandated that food producers phase out the use of Trans Fats by June 2018.


The FDA estimates this will cost the Food Industry an estimated $6.2 billion over 20 years as companies work to replace the ingredient, and reformulate their foods. However, the FDA asserts, the $6.2 billion cost is dwarfed by the estimated $140 billion in health care savings over the same time period.


Supreme Court Rules to Keep the Affordable Care Act Alive and Well

Supreme Court Rules to Keep the Affordable Care Act Alive and Well

Since its proposal, the Affordable Care Act has walked a tempestuous path, but it seems the ACA's road ahead just got much smoother.


The Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Federal Government (Burwell) in King v. Burwell, June 25, over the question of whether tax credits issued by the IRS to individuals purchasing insurance through a Federal Government Health Insurance Exchange exceeded the power Congress granted the IRS when it passed the Affordable Care and Patient Protection Act.


New Devices Make Telehealth Easier, Cheaper

New Devices Make Telehealth Easier, Cheaper

Recent advances in telehealth technology have made it easier, cheaper and more effective for health care professionals to monitor and even care for patients remotely. As wearable technology, like the Apple Watch or Sleep & Activity Trackers, become more and more popular, Doctors will have a wealth of continuously updated, real-time data unavailable until now.


With more data available to doctors than ever before, the question then becomes if and how that data can be utilized. Many see a place for telemedical technology in monitoring a patient after an invasive procedure, or to keep track of a patients fitness regimen. For instance, after a patient leaves the hospital, it becomes much more difficult for doctors to get accurate information on their well being. Devices that send actual data such as temperature, heart rate, and other information directly to doctors can help physicians detect and treat illness before it requires more intensive care.


Could Humans Survive the Trip to Mars?

Could Humans Survive the Trip to Mars?

As the Mars Rover, Curiosity, continues its search for conditions that may once have supported life on the Red Planet, many people wonder whether colonization of Mars, or any extraterrestrial body, will one day be a possibility.


The answer: Probably not for a long while.


Proper Vaccine Storage and Handling

Proper Vaccine Storage and Handling

The development of vaccines for infectious diseases, like Small Pox, Whooping Cough, or Influenza, has proven the most effective means of preventing disease, and accounts for the prevention of two to three million deaths each year, according the World Health Organization. The efficacy of most vaccines, however, is tied to the environment in which they're stored -- and if they're not stored correctly, their capacity to produce immunity greatly diminishes.


Typically, vaccines are either refrigerated or frozen in a Medical-Grade Refrigerator or Freezer with Temperature alerts, such as the Accucold line by Summit Appliance. Summit's fridges and freezers feature ample room to properly store frozen and refrigerated items, and both the freezer and fridge have separate thermostats for precise temperature control.


We Remember: Happy Memorial Day

We Remember: Happy Memorial Day

QuickMedical would like to extend its most heartfelt thanks to the women and men of the United States Armed Forces on this Memorial Day. Thank you for everything!

Aluminum Battery Could Revolutionize Electronics and AEDs

Aluminum Battery Could Revolutionize Electronics and AEDs

Stanford scientists successfully created a hyper-efficient aluminum-ion battery that fully charges in about one minute, and has a projected lifespan seven times that of current lithium-ion batteries. The new technology has the potential to make electronics safer and more reliable.


"We have developed a rechargeable aluminum battery that may replace existing storage devices, such as alkaline batteries, which are bad for the environment, and lithium-ion batteries, which occasionally burst into flames," Hongjie Dai, a professor of chemistry at Stanford, told Stanford News. "Our new battery won't catch fire, even if you drill through it."