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QuickMedical - Medical Equipment and Supplies - Blog

Measuring Height with the 235D Heightronic Digital Stadiometer

In 2014 QuickMedical launched an update of its flagship product: the 235D Heightronic digital stadiometer. Now QuickMedical announces the release of new videos showing operation, calibration, and installation of the digital height rod. Watch the video below on measuring height with the 235D Heightronic. When accuracy and repeatability are important to your facility, choose the QuickMedical 235D.



Why Should We Use LED Lighting in a Surgery Center?

Why Should We Use LED Lighting in a Surgery Center?

Lighting in a hospital or clinic, just like in a home or business, is everything. Without proper lighting, any interior without windows becomes dark and shadowy to the human eye. While there are some places which need to remain dark for a variety of reasons, to carry out most of the day-to-day business of life, light is necessary. In a surgical setting the importance of surgical lighting cannot be stressed enough. Surgeons, nurses, and assistants must be able to clearly see instruments, patients, and the area where they are working for the safety of everyone involved. LED lighting is quickly becoming the standard for surgical lighting. Why should hospitals use LED lighting?

New at QuickMedical: Elkay Plastics Medical Bags and Packaging

New at QuickMedical: Elkay Plastics Medical Bags and Packaging

Elkay Plastics is a leading manufacturer of superior quality plastic bags for labs, pharmacies, hospitals, and long term care facilities. Medical facilities use poly bags for a variety of applications. Click read more to learn about the different types of all new quality medical plastic bags available at QuickMedical.

Point of Care Diagnostic Equipment

Point of Care Diagnostic Equipment

Medical care has always had a point- of-care diagnostic component. The concept of point-of-care medical diagnostic testing is not new, but over the last 10 years new technologies have made point-of-care testing very efficient and cost-effective. According to the National Institute of Health, "Point-of-care testing gives immediate results in non-laboratory settings to support more patient- centered approaches to healthcare delivery."


Before the 20th century, most people saw doctors inside their homes. House calls almost always featured some form of diagnostic test performed during the doctor's visit. But in the 20th century, as medical technology advanced, care shifted to large, centralized health facilities, and testing moved to labs where patients, testing, and cures could be delivered efficiently. Many diagnostic procedures were available, but prohibitively expensive in a point-of-care setting so they shifted to hospitals and labs. Focusing mainly on curative measures, diagnostics in general focused on diagnosing specific illnesses. Rapid developments in computing technology over the last two decades have lowered the cost of many point-of-care medical diagnostic tests. Medical care philosophies have shifted as well. Today, medical professionals focus on preventative care instead of curative care which makes POC testing imporant.


Today, with a small blood sample, medical professionals can perform a variety of blood tests during an office visit and immediately provide counseling and care. Quickmedical offers many important point-of-care testing instruments to simplify every patient's visit for concerns like cholesterol abnormality, diabetes testing, urinalysis, respiratory analysis, and more. Click ahead to learn about some of these.

QuickMedical Questions: What's Your Hand Hygiene Excuse?

QuickMedical Questions: What's Your Hand Hygiene Excuse?

Q. I thought everyone would realize the importance of hand hygiene, but even the health care professionals I work with don't seem to understand how important it is. What could possibly be their excuse? What can I do to improve hand hygiene where I work?


A. The simple answer is that there are few things more important than hand hygiene in health facilities. It's very important all facility personnel are educated on CDC guidelines for hand hygiene. In a recent article Dr. Robert Pearl, CEO of The Permanente Medical Group writes, "[S]tatistically, [health care workers are]more likely to spread C. diff to their patients than they are to contract it. That's because the most common way C. diff is spread is on the hands of health care workers who fail to wash up between patients." Clostridium difficile or C. diff is linked to 14,000 deaths a year in the United States alone. C diff is just one of many hospital acquired infections that health care workers can spread, but rarely contract. Why would a health care worker not practice hand hygiene? Click ahead for the reasons, observed and reported, which might surprise you.

BZK Antiseptic Towelettes Uses

BZK Antiseptic Towelettes Uses

What are the most popular uses for BZK antiseptic towelettes? BZK antiseptic towelettes are ideal for a variety of medical uses. The sterile BZK Antiseptic Towelettes from MedPride are used in hospitals and doctors' offices for minor wound care, perineal care, and clean catch urine collection. The alcohol-free, sterile wipes, which are 4.7 inches by 7 inches, contain 0.113 percent of benzalkonium chloride, which acts as a gentle antiseptic. BZK solutions are fast-acting biocidal agents. They are active against bacteria and some viruses, fungi, and protozoa. As an interesting sidenote-- in a 1998 study, after repeated use, alcohol-containing hand sanitizers were shown to be slightly less effective than BZK based hand sanitizers.


MedPride MPR-41505 Sterile BZK (benzalkonium chloride) Antiseptic Towelettes can also be used to cleanse skin around minor cuts, scrapes, and burns. These towelettes can also be used for personal cleaning and sanitary needs when regular washing is not available or convenient. Varied BZK Antiseptic towelette uses all rely on the product's size, antiseptic chemical properties, and ease of access and use.

QuickMedical Supports Cervical Cancer Prevention

QuickMedical Supports Cervical Cancer Prevention

Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable cancers, yet up to 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the United States every year. Early screenings are the most important part of prevention. According to the American Cancer Society, the cervical cancer death rate has declined by 50% over the last 30 years mainly due to the effectiveness of the pap screening. 50% of patients diagnosed with cervical cancer have never had a pap test. Many patients will use the new year to catch up on health screenings they might have put off. January is Cervical Health Awareness Month so many patients will be reminded to make gynecological appointments.


Recently updated guidelines have changed which patients require tests. It is now recommended that all females begin having pap tests at age 21, regardless of when they become sexually active. Also, the "yearly pap" is no longer recommended. Research indicates women can safely have pap tests once every three years. In some cases, it can be helpful to do an HPV test along with a pap test. HPV tests find the "high risk" types of HPV that cause most cases of cervical cancer. The HPV test/pap test combination is now the recommended way to check for cervical cancer in women age 30 and older, although it is still acceptable to check women over 30 with pap tests alone.


Gynecologists use and trust Wallach Papette Cervical Call Collectors for safe, trauma free pap tests. These high-tech brushes reduce bleeding and enable greater accuracy in results due to a higher overall cell yield. It's important for facilities to be ready for increasing numbers of patients making appointments who will require pap tests and potentially more invasive cancer screenings. Often when a pap test shows an abnormal result, colposcopy may be recommended, but it is not always necessary. Colposcopy is an in-office procedure that allows doctors to look very closely at a patient's cervix using a colposcope. Colposcopes magnify the tissues in the cervix and allow for tissue biopsy. Abnormal results from a pap test can be easily examined and confirmed through colposcopy. Colposcopy is often performed in conjunction with other or repeated tests.


Keep your patients informed and up to date on the new guidelines for cervical health tests this month.

Preventing SSI: Perioperative Issues

Preventing SSI: Perioperative Issues

A key component of the Affordable Care Act was the establishment of Value-Based Purchasing, which rewards or penalizes facilities that receive Medicare and Medicaid payments based on certain performance metrics like Prevention Quality Indicators and Patient Safety Indicators which examine readmission rates and Healthcare-Acquired Infection rates to determine payment schedules for facilities.


HAIs represent nearly 10 percent of inpatient costs in the United States, and are one of the Affordable Care Act's top priorities. Surgical Site Infections account for nearly 20 percent of all HAIs, and since HAI rates alone can reduce government payments to hospitals for Medicare patients by up to 3 percent, it is imperative that caregivers have access to the products and information needed to keep themselves and patients safe, while saving hospitals and taxpayers money.


Click read more to find information about common perioperative surgical issues and how to use them as opportunities to stem infection before it begins.


New Year Weight Loss

New Year Weight Loss

We all have a friend, family member, or coworker who has managed to transform themselves from a size sixteen to a four. Someone who's gone from 300 pounds to half that. It is that friend, or that family member, or that co worker who is ruining it for the rest of us. They are the examples that tell us that we can do it, too.


But what if we can't? What if, no matter how many miles we peddle on a stationary bike, no matter how many stalks of broccoli we eat, we will never be able to lose that extra weight?


"It couldn't be easier to see," said Traci Mann, a University of Minnesota psychologist who's studied weight loss and eating for 20 years. "Long-term weight loss happens to only the smallest minority of people."


What is the "smallest minority of people" exactly? Five percent, or one in twenty. When Mann analyzed the available randomized control trials dealing with weight loss in the long term, she found that the average person had a net weight loss of only two pounds after two years.


Why, then, do some doctors continue to insist on exercise and eating right if it doesn't lead to weight loss?


The Challenge of Measuring Blood Pressure in Obese Patients

The Challenge of Measuring Blood Pressure in Obese Patients

According to a study in the Journal of Hypertension, measuring blood pressure in obese patients is a particular and challenging problem. Authored by two Italian doctors, the study reiterates the conditions for optimal blood pressure measurement and explains that one of the most pressing problems in measuring the blood pressure of obese patients is the selection of cuff size. While there are additional factors which ensure a proper blood pressure reading, including posture of patient, arm support for patient, and patient education on the process, cuff size and selection remains essential, and one of the most misunderstood requirements. The American Academy of Family Physicians claims, "The most common error in blood pressure measurement is use of inappropriate cuff size."


In 2005 the American Heart Association recommended four cuff sizes for use-- a small adult cuff, an adult cuff, a large adult cuff, and an adult thigh cuff. The adult thigh cuff could be used on the largest arms. Using a thigh cuff for an arm is not ideal, and not technically correct, and can lead to errors and misdiagnosis. Blood pressure cuff size is relative to the arm circumference and also the arm's shape. A conical-shaped arm, common in obese individuals, makes it difficult to fit a cuff to the arm, increasing the likelihood of inaccurate BP measurements. The improper fit of a thigh cuff on a large arm will cause errors.


ADC has created a unique solution to the problem of selecting the proper blood pressure cuff for the obese patient-- the Adcuff Bariatric blood pressure cuff. Instead of using the thigh cuff, which is designed for a thigh and not an arm, doctors and nurses should measure bariatric patients with bariatric arm cuffs specifically designed for their patient's unique needs. The Adcuff Bariatric Sphygmomanometer Cuffs feature a radically curved shape, providing a snug fit for reliable measurements. The Extra Large BP Cuff is compatible with most manual sphygmomanometers. Index and range markings are included to ensure user of the correct cuff size. An accurate artery mark also helps with proper placement.