Please wait while we process your request

QuickMedical - Medical Equipment and Supplies - Blog

How Can I Tell if I Have a Fever?

How Can I Tell if I Have a Fever?

Do you have a fever? How can I tell if I have a fever? The traditional average human temperature figure of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit was set in 1878 by German doctor Carl Wunderlich. However a modern study by the Veterans Administration showed normal temperatures for individuals ranged from 96 to 99.9, and the average was actually 98.2 degrees.


Presently, temperatures are regularly taken at airports around the world. Professional temporal thermometers, like the Exergen TAT-5000 are the ideal choice for non-invasive, hygienic, thermometry for large groups and are being used with great success in identifying patient temperatures. But what is the medical standard for an above normal temperature? From the results of this study, how can I tell if I have a fever?

Healthcare PPE for Ebola

Healthcare PPE for Ebola

The Centers for Disease Control are tightening previous infection control guidance for healthcare workers PPE and caring for patients with Ebola to ensure there is no ambiguity. The enhanced guidance is centered on three principles. Click read more for the 3 principles.

Egg Freezing Won't Stop the Biological Clock

Egg Freezing Won't Stop the Biological Clock

In what seems like a well-meaning move, Apple and Facebook recently announced that they would pay for egg freezing procedures for their female employees. The corporations still each have male dominated workforces (Apple with 70% men and Facebook 69%), and they say they are trying to entice more women to start careers with them, with the idea that frozen eggs will extend their career before they have children.


While at first glance this decision may seem generous, egg freezing is actually a very risky medical procedure. To learn more about egg freezing click ahead.

Using Hand Held Vascular Dopplers in Hospitals

Using Hand Held Vascular Dopplers in Hospitals

According to a medical study from the Royal United Hospital in Bath, Great Britain, the use of hand-held dopplers are ideal for finding difficult forearm veins for cannulation. According to the study, hand-held dopplers need not be limited in their use with OB/GYN clinics. Any clinic seeking cannulation for "difficult" veins can use a hand held doppler to accurately inject patients. In all, 96% of patient arms had the largest vein correctly identified by the hand-held Doppler.


Handheld vascular dopplers can be an alternative to more invasive procedures, such as arteriography and venography, which involve injecting dye into the blood vessels so that they show up clearly on X-ray images. A doppler test can also help doctors check for injuries to arteries or to monitor certain treatments to veins and arteries.


Currently, if your facility buys any 4 Newman DigiDops (DD-series) it will get one free. Your clinic can also get a $50 rebate on your old dopplers. Contact QuickMedical for more details on these offers.


The Newman Medical Rechargeable Hand Held Vascular Doppler DigiDops come in 4 series-- DD-300 DD-301 DD-700 DD-701 . These dopplers are designed to provide the highest sound quality for vascular examinations. The vascular dopplers use a unique technology Newman calls DOP (Digitally Optimized Processing), an advanced signal processing that converts the audio signal to digital, reducing unwanted background noise.

The Teal Pumpkin Project

The Teal Pumpkin Project

Halloween is almost here! While the holiday should be nothing but fun for kids, allergies can take the night from spooky to truly scary. Many kids are allergic to milk, nuts, eggs, wheat, or soy. These allergies make most Halloween candy off-limits for children, and can sometimes even be deadly.


That's where the Teal Pumpkin Project comes in. A movement was started this fall to make trick-or-treating safe for kids that in the past would have been left out. The idea is, if you are giving out non-food treats on Halloween, you put a teal pumpkin outside your door so that kids and parents can plan a safe and fun night! Started by the Food Allergy Research and Education organization, the Teal Pumpkin Project has taken off online and people are already posting their own teal pumpkins on social media.


It is important to stay extra cautious this time of year. Because of factory production of candies, some sweets that might seem safe won't be, due to cross-contaimination with food allergens. The Food Allergy Research and Education organization recommends that parents carry an epinephrine auto-injector, and to make sure that all medication is up-to-date. It's best to wait until arriving at home home to check all treats properly, because while walking in the dark it's easy for a child to eat something they shouldn't.


This time of year can be nerve-wracking for parents of children with allergies, but with the help of the Teal Pumpkin Project, it can get a little bit easier for everyone to enjoy themselves this Halloween.

The St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital McDonalds' Monoply Donation

The St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital McDonalds' Monoply Donation

As a struggling young actor, Danny Thomas prayed for success in show business through the intercession of St. Jude, the patron saint of hopeless causes. He made a vow-- if he found financial success, he would open a shrine dedicated to St. Jude. Thomas kept his promise and after becoming a successful actor in the early 1950s, he began to raise funds to build the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Although it was named after Thomas's patron saint, St. Jude is not a Catholic hospital and not affiliated with any religious organization. The mission statement given by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is "to advance cures, and means of prevention, for pediatric catastrophic diseases through research and treatment. Consistent with the vision of our founder Danny Thomas, no child is denied treatment based on race, religion or a family's ability to pay." Discoveries at St. Jude have completely changed how doctors treat children with cancer and other catastrophic illnesses according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Since St. Jude was established, the survival rate for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common type of childhood cancer, has increased from 4 percent in 1962 to 94 percent.


Because St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital is an independent charity, it is funded by philanthropic aid. It is one of the few pediatric hospitals that patients without insurance are never asked to pay. QuickMedical is a proud donator to St. Jude's. Donations keep the research hospital running, and anyone who can donate even a small amount should consider helping out the organization. In the mid-90s there was a donation that turned into a mystery. Click ahead to read about the anonymous 1 million dollar donation to St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital that was much more complicated than any other.


QuickMedical Questions: What Are the Most Vitamin Rich Foods?

QuickMedical Questions: What Are the Most Vitamin Rich Foods?

Often customers or casual web surfers will send us questions, via Facebook, Twitter, or email about health issues or medical equipment and supplies. Since we're not doctors, we can't offer you specific health advice. If you're really concerned, you should always consult a health professional. A curious Facebooker writes:


"It seems like everyone is taking vitamins for something these days, and because we eat way more processed food than we used to, it makes sense. I have been wanting to eat more natural foods for vitamins. What do you think? What are some of the most vitamin rich foods?


-Anonymous Eater


We think it's a great idea. In fact, "If you're trying to eat a healthier diet, relying on more whole foods is a great place to start," Lucia L. Kaiser, PhD, community nutrition specialist in the department of nutrition at the University of California, Davis told WebMD.com. Patients who eat diets of natural, whole foods have shown a decreased risk in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in many medical studies. Click read more for our list of the most vitamin rich foods.


Ebola in Dallas

There's been confusing and alarming talk about Ebola lately. Most of the fear died down in the U.S. a few weeks ago, while the virus continued to spread in Africa. Then, on September 28th, a patient was diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S. He traveled from Liberia on the 20th of September, started showing symptoms on the 24th, but wasn't effectively quarantined until the 28th. This means that there were 4 days that he could have transmitted the infection.


It's fairly hard to spread Ebola. It's not an airborne contagion like the flu. However, contact with bodily fluids does spread it. Anyone who made physical contact, even shaking hands with the patient, will now have to be isolated and monitored for 3 weeks.


Everyone who flies from West Africa, where Ebola is at its worst, is being screened for fever before flight. If they do have a fever, they are pulled from line and tested for Ebola. However, this patient wasn't showing symptoms until after he landed in Dallas.


An extensive tracking process is underway to find anyone that has been in contact with the patient, and through isolation nobody new will be exposed to the infection.


Ebola is not contagious until there are symptoms. No one on the plane he flew on is at risk, and nobody he came in contact within the first few days is at risk. This is the first case of Ebola in the United States. People have been in the US with the disease, but it was always contracted while elsewhere and their movements were closely tracked.


Ebola in Dallas

The rarity of the disease here led to some questionable actions by the doctors, in particular sending the patient home with antibiotics before testing him for Ebola virus disease, even though he told his nurse that he had traveled from West Africa. Dallas is on high alert to keep the infection from spreading. The apartment complex where the man was staying is still open to the public, as well as the school where the 5 children he came into contact with attend.


One of the easiest and best ways hospitals and even entire cities can prepare for these types of emergencies are with Kontrol Kube mobile containment systems. The Kontrol Kube by Fiberlock can be configured for use as a temporary anteroom, converting a patient or procedure room into an emergency airborne isolation room. The Kontrol Kube can be quickly set up to provide containment wherever it is needed without costly disruptions to patients and schedules. The unit can be used in conjunction with either a negative or positive pressure patient room.


Ebola in Dallas

Contact QuickMedical for questions on Kontrol Kube containment systems or to purchase these innovative isolation environment solutions today.

Enterovirus 68 Hits California

California was the 18th state hit by an Enterovirus 68 (EV-68) outbreak. The virus impacts children, especially children with asthma, causing respiratory illness that can lead to severe breathing problems.


Enterovirus 68 Hits California

At present, no vaccine exists to prevent contracting EV-68, so basic illness prevention protocol is recommended by the CDC. Look to QuickMedical for hand sanitizers, antibacterial soap, face masks, and anything else you may need to keep you and your family safe.


The virus is most common in the summer, so officials expect the number of cases to decrease as the year goes on and the temperature drops. Thus far, only children have contracted the disease -- adults without asthma or other respiratory ailments are generally immune. The virus is spread by an infected person coughing or sneezing.


Enteroviruses are very common, but this particular strain hasn't often appeared since it was discovered in 1962.


The illness lasts about a week and isn't fatal - often manifesting only as cold symptoms. Cases have been confirmed in Connecticut, Montana, Nebraska, Virginia, Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and New York.

It's Time to Talk About Pre-Diabetes

It's Time to Talk About Pre-Diabetes

For many years the population of the United States has grown steadily older and heavier. Those facts have been enumerated at length on countless news programs, in newspapers, and online. More concerning, however, is a condition these factors help cause, but one that gets little, if any, coverage: pre-diabetes.